Natural Resources Wales

Since April 2013 the Countryside Council for Wales (CCW) has merged with Environment Agency Wales and Forestry Commission Wales to form Natural Resources Wales (NRW). NRW is the principal adviser to the Welsh Government on the environment, enabling the sustainable development of Wales' natural resources for the benefit of people, the economy and wildlife. NRW aims to ensure that the natural resources of Wales are sustainably maintained, enhanced and used, now and in the future. NRW will continue the full range of geoconservation functions previously undertaken by CCW.

Objective 1 (Theme 1)

Foster research

  • Investigations in the fluvial environment
    Since its inception, CCW has provided funding streams for a wide range of fluvial research projects. These have included investigations into, for example, the causes of river channel change, the geochemical and geomorphological controls on the development of nationally rare shingle heath environments along the Ystwyth and Rheidol rivers, and a detailed geomorphological mapping programme along segments of the upper River Severn. All of these projects have been carried out with the primary aim of developing a comprehensive evidence base and effective framework for catchment management and river conservation in Wales.

  • Welsh Geomorphological Map Pilot Project
    There is no comprehensive geomorphological map of Wales. Over the last 150 years, the mapping of geomorphological features and landforms has occurred in a piecemeal fashion. The result is that huge amounts of data, of variable quality and at different scales, have been produced. The Welsh Geomorphological Map Pilot Project was established to look at potential data sources and produce a broad geomorphological framework for Wales through the use of remote sensing. This initiative produced detailed maps of three areas in North and Mid Wales (Cadair Idris, Pentrefoelas and Pumlumon) using satellite and aerial imagery followed by ground-truthing. The geomorphological maps show the spatial distribution of glacial, periglacial and postglacial features such as cirques, end moraines, glacial striae, block fields, tors, meltwater channels, scree slopes and alluvial fans. The mapped landforms are used to make inferences about the Quaternary glacial history of these areas which could provide recommendations for conservation of GCR and RIGS sites, feed in to landscape scale work such as LANDMAP and Landscape Character Areas, in addition to identifying underpinning Ecosystems Services. At present these maps are only available for the three areas completed during the pilot project. However, the development of this work for other parts of Wales, and ultimately a pan-Wales dataset, would be a very valuable resource

  • MINESCAN
    In a 4-year project funded by CCW, the National Museum Wales (NMW) was commissioned to investigate the mineralogical heritage of Wales. The project involved the detailed field assessment of over 1000 localities throughout Wales, including abandoned mines, disused and active quarries and other mineralogical sites. This research defined a comprehensive network of GCR sites and RIGS and, through a partnership project with NMW, culminated in the Mineralogy of Wales website.

  • Mapping and Conservation Assessment of Pingos in Wales
    This was a joint CCW/University of Cardiff (Department of Earth Sciences) project undertaken as a Ph.D. study that mapped pingos (ground ice depressions) in Wales. Pingos are arguably better developed in Wales than anywhere else in the British Isles. However, prior to this study no comprehensive review of this geomorphological resource had ever been undertaken. Moreover, these are relatively small-scale and fragile landforms and, over the years, many pingos have been drained or destroyed. Many pingo basins contain significant flora and fauna, often with a thick peat deposit that contains an important pollen record which can be radiocarbon dated, thereby providing an important history of environmental change spanning some 10,000 years. Key objectives for the project were to locate all remaining pingos and similar landforms across Wales, to map and compare them, and to examine the structure of a selected few in greater detail. The study provided a framework for conserving key parts of this important geomorphological resource (either as SSSI or RIGS).

Objective 2 (Theme 2)

Recognition in policy

  • Geodiversity Wales
    CCW is a lead partner, along with the National Museum Wales, the British Geological Survey and the Association of Welsh RIGS Groups, in setting up 'Geodiversity Wales' to bring together the major players in Welsh geoconservation. 'Geodiversity Wales' aims to promote an understanding of Welsh geology and landscape. In consultation with organisations and groups concerned with Welsh geology, geodiversity, landscape, heritage and culture this partnership will offer a co-ordinated, knowledgeable, consistent and integrated approach to geoconservation in Wales, and will provide robust scientific and policy advice to decision makers.

  • Geodiversity in Landscape Character Areas
    CCW have defined 48 Landscape Character Areas in Wales in order to provide broad spatial frames for planning, green infrastructure and landscape management initiatives. Wales has a remarkable diversity of landscapes, where patterns of natural and human elements combine to give a particular sense of place. Influencing, and often controlling, this landscape is the geodiversity. Each Landscape Character Area description includes a profile of its geodiversity, including an outline of the bedrock geology, geomorphology, landscape setting and key geoconservation sites.

  • The Natural Environment Framework in Wales
    The Natural Environment Framework (NEF) is being developed in Wales to help deliver a more integrated approach to the management of the environment - one which reflects the complex ways in which environmental systems interact, the value of the services they provide to society, the pressures posed by a changing climate, and the limits of natural capacity. Achieving such an approach, and putting the health of ecosystems at the heart of all decision making, was one of the main sustainable development challenges of the 2006 Environment Strategy for Wales and Welsh Government has stated that 'sustainable development is the central organizing principle of everything we do. As a consequence, CCW staff have worked hard to ensure that geodiversity is embedded at the heart of the NEF and that the cultural and socio-economic values and benefits of Wales' geodiversity resource are fully recognized.

  • Responding to planning and policy consultations
    CCW is a statutory consultee for all planning applications that may affect geological/geomorphological SSSI.

Objective 3 (Theme 2)

Demonstrate relevance to sustainable development

  • Geological and geomorphological mapping (LANDMAP)
    LANDMAP is a GIS-based resource that assesses the diversity of landscapes within Wales; it identifies and explains their most important characteristics and qualities, including geological features - whether they are ordinary but locally important landscapes, or nationally recognised spectacular landscapes. Users (planning authorities, consultants, conservation groups etc) are able to view thematic maps which detail the Geological Landscape, Landscape Habitats, Visual & Sensory, Historic Landscape and Cultural Landscape at a range of scales, across all of Wales. LANDMAP’s ‘Geological Landscape’ layer required classification and mapping of all Geological Landscape Aspect Areas and Aspect Areas ‘data capture’ which includes Description, Evaluation and Management Recommendations.

  • Geodiversity Wales
    CCW is a lead partner, along with the National Museum Wales, the British Geological Survey and the Association of Welsh RIGS Groups, in setting up 'Geodiversity Wales' to bring together the major players in Welsh geoconservation. 'Geodiversity Wales' aims to promote an understanding of Welsh geology and landscape. In consultation with organisations and groups concerned with Welsh geology, geodiversity, landscape, heritage and culture this partnership will offer a co-ordinated, knowledgeable, consistent and integrated approach to geoconservation in Wales, and will provide robust scientific and policy advice to decision makers.

  • Geodiversity in Landscape Character Areas
    CCW have defined 48 Landscape Character Areas in Wales in order to provide broad spatial frames for planning, green infrastructure and landscape management initiatives. Wales has a remarkable diversity of landscapes, where patterns of natural and human elements combine to give a particular sense of place. Influencing, and often controlling, this landscape is the geodiversity. Each Landscape Character Area description includes a profile of its geodiversity, including an outline of the bedrock geology, geomorphology, landscape setting and key geoconservation sites.

  • The Natural Environment Framework in Wales
    The Natural Environment Framework (NEF) is being developed in Wales to help deliver a more integrated approach to the management of the environment - one which reflects the complex ways in which environmental systems interact, the value of the services they provide to society, the pressures posed by a changing climate, and the limits of natural capacity. Achieving such an approach, and putting the health of ecosystems at the heart of all decision making, was one of the main sustainable development challenges of the 2006 Environment Strategy for Wales and Welsh Government has stated that 'sustainable development is the central organizing principle of everything we do. As a consequence, CCW staff have worked hard to ensure that geodiversity is embedded at the heart of the NEF and that the cultural and socio-economic values and benefits of Wales' geodiversity resource are fully recognized.

Objective 4 (Theme 2)

Advocate design that enhances

  • Geodiversity in Landscape Character Areas
    CCW have defined 48 Landscape Character Areas in Wales in order to provide broad spatial frames for planning, green infrastructure and landscape management initiatives. Wales has a remarkable diversity of landscapes, where patterns of natural and human elements combine to give a particular sense of place. Influencing, and often controlling, this landscape is the geodiversity. Each Landscape Character Area description includes a profile of its geodiversity, including an outline of the bedrock geology, geomorphology, landscape setting and key geoconservation sites.

Objective 5 (Theme 3)

Establish audit

  • Investigations in the fluvial environment
    Since its inception, CCW has provided funding streams for a wide range of fluvial research projects. These have included investigations into, for example, the causes of river channel change, the geochemical and geomorphological controls on the development of nationally rare shingle heath environments along the Ystwyth and Rheidol rivers, and a detailed geomorphological mapping programme along segments of the upper River Severn. All of these projects have been carried out with the primary aim of developing a comprehensive evidence base and effective framework for catchment management and river conservation in Wales.

  • Site Management and Monitoring
    There are 474 Geological Conservation Review sites in Wales where the geological interest can vary from Precambrian fossils some 600 million years old to active processes sites along the coast. Such a varied geological resource is found in numerous locations ranging from a small disused quarry near Cardiff to a large working quarry near Builth Wells, or on the foreshore near Barry to the summit of Snowdon. The variety of features and types of sites provide different challenges for site management and monitoring. In order to aid management each site is classified into two types. Namely, Integrity Sites that contain finite deposits or landforms which are irreplaceable if destroyed, and Exposure Sites that provide exposures of rock which is extensive or also well-developed below the ground surface. CCW monitors each GCR site every 1 to 5 years depending on the sensitivity of the Erath science feature, whether it is an exposure or integrity site, and its location. Regular monitoring of the condition of the site allows CCW geologists to anticipate and identify degradation or damage to the scientific feature.

  • Welsh Geomorphological Map Pilot Project
    There is no comprehensive geomorphological map of Wales. Over the last 150 years, the mapping of geomorphological features and landforms has occurred in a piecemeal fashion. The result is that huge amounts of data, of variable quality and at different scales, have been produced. The Welsh Geomorphological Map Pilot Project was established to look at potential data sources and produce a broad geomorphological framework for Wales through the use of remote sensing. This initiative produced detailed maps of three areas in North and Mid Wales (Cadair Idris, Pentrefoelas and Pumlumon) using satellite and aerial imagery followed by ground-truthing. The geomorphological maps show the spatial distribution of glacial, periglacial and postglacial features such as cirques, end moraines, glacial striae, block fields, tors, meltwater channels, scree slopes and alluvial fans. The mapped landforms are used to make inferences about the Quaternary glacial history of these areas which could provide recommendations for conservation of GCR and RIGS sites, feed in to landscape scale work such as LANDMAP and Landscape Character Areas, in addition to identifying underpinning Ecosystems Services. At present these maps are only available for the three areas completed during the pilot project. However, the development of this work for other parts of Wales, and ultimately a pan-Wales dataset, would be a very valuable resource

  • Documentation to inform management of geological features
    CCW has developed a tiered approach to site documentation which can inform management both internally and externally. Site Management Reports (SMR) include the core GCR information, site boundary, site description and key conservation and management objectives for the site, all of which are illustrated by photographs and diagrams where required. SMRs provide a portable and accessible resource that can be used by CCW geologists and other CCW staff. Minimum Format Management Plans provide site managers and officers with the conservation objectives for the features. Finally, all landowners and occupiers have been provided with a Site Management Statement which explains what is special about the geology and what care is needed after its geology into the future.

  • MINESCAN
    In a 4-year project funded by CCW, the National Museum Wales (NMW) was commissioned to investigate the mineralogical heritage of Wales. The project involved the detailed field assessment of over 1000 localities throughout Wales, including abandoned mines, disused and active quarries and other mineralogical sites. This research defined a comprehensive network of GCR sites and RIGS and, through a partnership project with NMW, culminated in the Mineralogy of Wales website.

  • Mapping and Conservation Assessment of Pingos in Wales
    This was a joint CCW/University of Cardiff (Department of Earth Sciences) project undertaken as a Ph.D. study that mapped pingos (ground ice depressions) in Wales. Pingos are arguably better developed in Wales than anywhere else in the British Isles. However, prior to this study no comprehensive review of this geomorphological resource had ever been undertaken. Moreover, these are relatively small-scale and fragile landforms and, over the years, many pingos have been drained or destroyed. Many pingo basins contain significant flora and fauna, often with a thick peat deposit that contains an important pollen record which can be radiocarbon dated, thereby providing an important history of environmental change spanning some 10,000 years. Key objectives for the project were to locate all remaining pingos and similar landforms across Wales, to map and compare them, and to examine the structure of a selected few in greater detail. The study provided a framework for conserving key parts of this important geomorphological resource (either as SSSI or RIGS).

  • All-Wales RIGS Audit
    CCW have contributed to the pan-Wales RIGS audit through financial and technical support. The audit started in 2003 and is the first comprehensive national assessment of second-tier sites in Wales which was undertaken largely by the local RIGS groups and CCW Earth Scientists. The majority of the funding came from the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund, but CCW contributed financially to the project in North Wales. The audit standardised the site documentation, digitised the site boundaries to a common format and ensured that the landowners and planning authorities were informed of the RIGS. A major input from CCW was the development of the GIS database for the project where all of the c.600 sites registered so far were digitised by CCW. CCW currently hosts these GIS data. The project is now nearing completion with the BGS co-ordinating the final stage of the audit in south and east Wales.

Objective 6 (Theme 4)

Conserve through sites and areas

  • Designation of GCR sites as geological SSSIs
    CCW is responsible for the designation, conservation and management of more than 1000 SSSIs, nearly 300 of which have geological features of interest. Notification of all 474 GCR features is a key priority for CCW

Objective 7 (Theme 4)

Maintain and enhance through management

  • Designation of GCR sites as geological SSSIs
    CCW is responsible for the designation, conservation and management of more than 1000 SSSIs, nearly 300 of which have geological features of interest. Notification of all 474 GCR features is a key priority for CCW

  • Provision of advice to site landowners
    CCW staff provide advice on grant aid and practical conservation management of SSSIs to landowners and help to guide the owner through the process of seeking consent to carry out operations or developments.

  • Site Management and Monitoring
    There are 474 Geological Conservation Review sites in Wales where the geological interest can vary from Precambrian fossils some 600 million years old to active processes sites along the coast. Such a varied geological resource is found in numerous locations ranging from a small disused quarry near Cardiff to a large working quarry near Builth Wells, or on the foreshore near Barry to the summit of Snowdon. The variety of features and types of sites provide different challenges for site management and monitoring. In order to aid management each site is classified into two types. Namely, Integrity Sites that contain finite deposits or landforms which are irreplaceable if destroyed, and Exposure Sites that provide exposures of rock which is extensive or also well-developed below the ground surface. CCW monitors each GCR site every 1 to 5 years depending on the sensitivity of the Erath science feature, whether it is an exposure or integrity site, and its location. Regular monitoring of the condition of the site allows CCW geologists to anticipate and identify degradation or damage to the scientific feature.

  • Documentation to inform management of geological features
    CCW has developed a tiered approach to site documentation which can inform management both internally and externally. Site Management Reports (SMR) include the core GCR information, site boundary, site description and key conservation and management objectives for the site, all of which are illustrated by photographs and diagrams where required. SMRs provide a portable and accessible resource that can be used by CCW geologists and other CCW staff. Minimum Format Management Plans provide site managers and officers with the conservation objectives for the features. Finally, all landowners and occupiers have been provided with a Site Management Statement which explains what is special about the geology and what care is needed after its geology into the future.

  • Mapping and Conservation Assessment of Pingos in Wales
    This was a joint CCW/University of Cardiff (Department of Earth Sciences) project undertaken as a Ph.D. study that mapped pingos (ground ice depressions) in Wales. Pingos are arguably better developed in Wales than anywhere else in the British Isles. However, prior to this study no comprehensive review of this geomorphological resource had ever been undertaken. Moreover, these are relatively small-scale and fragile landforms and, over the years, many pingos have been drained or destroyed. Many pingo basins contain significant flora and fauna, often with a thick peat deposit that contains an important pollen record which can be radiocarbon dated, thereby providing an important history of environmental change spanning some 10,000 years. Key objectives for the project were to locate all remaining pingos and similar landforms across Wales, to map and compare them, and to examine the structure of a selected few in greater detail. The study provided a framework for conserving key parts of this important geomorphological resource (either as SSSI or RIGS).

Objective 8 (Theme 4)

Share good practice

  • Provision of advice to site landowners
    CCW staff provide advice on grant aid and practical conservation management of SSSIs to landowners and help to guide the owner through the process of seeking consent to carry out operations or developments.

  • Share good practice - provision of advice
    CCW geologists provide advice to landowners/occupiers and external bodies regarding all aspects of best practice management of geosites throughout Wales. This also applies to operations/activities in the wider landscape of Wales, for example footpath restoration schemes, forestry plantations, and flood defence projects in both the coastal and fluvial environments.

Objective 9 (Theme 5)

Make relevant to the wider world

  • Geoconservation on CCW Website
    CCW's website is undergoing a major revamp and the inclusion of a Geoconservation Chapter will be an important addition. Information relating to geoconservation and the GCR site network will be expanded with more detail on the protected sites and their management. The Geoconservation Chapter will also provide an important first port of call for people wanting to learn about the geology of Wales. The website will include sections on Wales through Time, Mineral Wealth of Wales and Geologists in Wales where people will find information on Wales' 600Ma journey northward from the southern hemisphere, learn about the rich mining heritage of Wales, as well as the important role Wales played in the development of geological science.

  • Geodiversity in Landscape Character Areas
    CCW have defined 48 Landscape Character Areas in Wales in order to provide broad spatial frames for planning, green infrastructure and landscape management initiatives. Wales has a remarkable diversity of landscapes, where patterns of natural and human elements combine to give a particular sense of place. Influencing, and often controlling, this landscape is the geodiversity. Each Landscape Character Area description includes a profile of its geodiversity, including an outline of the bedrock geology, geomorphology, landscape setting and key geoconservation sites.

  • Initiatives to make geodiversity relevant to the wider world
    CCW geologists have contributed to numerous educational initiatives designed to raise public awareness of Wales' geodiversity resource. These include geological trails, on-site interpretation boards and leaflets, field trips and, most recently, a booklet aimed at encouraging children to develop an interest in the geodiversity of Wales.

  • Supporting RIGS Interpretation initiatives
    Since its inception, CCW has supported partners who promote the understanding of geodiversity through grant aid and specialist support. One example of this is CCW's support of RIGS (Regionally Important Geodiversity Sites) groups who have been very active in developing interpretation initiatives that encourage the public to look at and appreciate the rocks and landscape around them. This may be through the development of trails looking at the geology between Aberystwyth and Clarach, or the mineral wealth of Coed y Brenin. But what has been especially successful is the development of geological town trails. These self-guided walks are available for a number of towns and look at the incredible wealth of building stones, obtained either locally or from around the world. Geological town trails offer an insight into the geological wealth of Wales and are an example of how geologists are keen raise awareness.

Objective 11 (Theme 5)

Create resources to help integrate geodiversity into learning

  • Geological and geomorphological mapping (LANDMAP)
    LANDMAP is a GIS-based resource that assesses the diversity of landscapes within Wales; it identifies and explains their most important characteristics and qualities, including geological features - whether they are ordinary but locally important landscapes, or nationally recognised spectacular landscapes. Users (planning authorities, consultants, conservation groups etc) are able to view thematic maps which detail the Geological Landscape, Landscape Habitats, Visual & Sensory, Historic Landscape and Cultural Landscape at a range of scales, across all of Wales. LANDMAP’s ‘Geological Landscape’ layer required classification and mapping of all Geological Landscape Aspect Areas and Aspect Areas ‘data capture’ which includes Description, Evaluation and Management Recommendations.

  • Geoconservation on CCW Website
    CCW's website is undergoing a major revamp and the inclusion of a Geoconservation Chapter will be an important addition. Information relating to geoconservation and the GCR site network will be expanded with more detail on the protected sites and their management. The Geoconservation Chapter will also provide an important first port of call for people wanting to learn about the geology of Wales. The website will include sections on Wales through Time, Mineral Wealth of Wales and Geologists in Wales where people will find information on Wales' 600Ma journey northward from the southern hemisphere, learn about the rich mining heritage of Wales, as well as the important role Wales played in the development of geological science.

  • Initiatives to make geodiversity relevant to the wider world
    CCW geologists have contributed to numerous educational initiatives designed to raise public awareness of Wales' geodiversity resource. These include geological trails, on-site interpretation boards and leaflets, field trips and, most recently, a booklet aimed at encouraging children to develop an interest in the geodiversity of Wales.

  • MINESCAN
    In a 4-year project funded by CCW, the National Museum Wales (NMW) was commissioned to investigate the mineralogical heritage of Wales. The project involved the detailed field assessment of over 1000 localities throughout Wales, including abandoned mines, disused and active quarries and other mineralogical sites. This research defined a comprehensive network of GCR sites and RIGS and, through a partnership project with NMW, culminated in the Mineralogy of Wales website.

  • Supporting RIGS Interpretation initiatives
    Since its inception, CCW has supported partners who promote the understanding of geodiversity through grant aid and specialist support. One example of this is CCW's support of RIGS (Regionally Important Geodiversity Sites) groups who have been very active in developing interpretation initiatives that encourage the public to look at and appreciate the rocks and landscape around them. This may be through the development of trails looking at the geology between Aberystwyth and Clarach, or the mineral wealth of Coed y Brenin. But what has been especially successful is the development of geological town trails. These self-guided walks are available for a number of towns and look at the incredible wealth of building stones, obtained either locally or from around the world. Geological town trails offer an insight into the geological wealth of Wales and are an example of how geologists are keen raise awareness.

Objective 12 (Theme 6)

Involve more people

  • GeoMôn partner
    In 2009, Anglesey became the second area in Wales to become a European Geopark. The Anglesey Geopark, known as GeoMôn, includes outstanding examples of Precambrian geology and is one of the finest places to study plate tectonic processes and features. CCW has heavy involvement in the ongoing geodiveristy activities and support of GeoMôn.

  • Geodiversity Wales
    CCW is a lead partner, along with the National Museum Wales, the British Geological Survey and the Association of Welsh RIGS Groups, in setting up 'Geodiversity Wales' to bring together the major players in Welsh geoconservation. 'Geodiversity Wales' aims to promote an understanding of Welsh geology and landscape. In consultation with organisations and groups concerned with Welsh geology, geodiversity, landscape, heritage and culture this partnership will offer a co-ordinated, knowledgeable, consistent and integrated approach to geoconservation in Wales, and will provide robust scientific and policy advice to decision makers.

  • All-Wales RIGS Audit
    CCW have contributed to the pan-Wales RIGS audit through financial and technical support. The audit started in 2003 and is the first comprehensive national assessment of second-tier sites in Wales which was undertaken largely by the local RIGS groups and CCW Earth Scientists. The majority of the funding came from the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund, but CCW contributed financially to the project in North Wales. The audit standardised the site documentation, digitised the site boundaries to a common format and ensured that the landowners and planning authorities were informed of the RIGS. A major input from CCW was the development of the GIS database for the project where all of the c.600 sites registered so far were digitised by CCW. CCW currently hosts these GIS data. The project is now nearing completion with the BGS co-ordinating the final stage of the audit in south and east Wales.

Objective 13 (Theme 6)

Increase financial support

  • GeoMôn partner
    In 2009, Anglesey became the second area in Wales to become a European Geopark. The Anglesey Geopark, known as GeoMôn, includes outstanding examples of Precambrian geology and is one of the finest places to study plate tectonic processes and features. CCW has heavy involvement in the ongoing geodiveristy activities and support of GeoMôn.

  • Involvement in LGAPs
    CCW have provided support and guidance in the development of Wales’ LGAPs - Anglesey LGAP is complete, and Clwydian Range AONB and Fforest Fawr (Brecon Beacons) Geopark LGAPs are in development.

  • All-Wales RIGS Audit
    CCW have contributed to the pan-Wales RIGS audit through financial and technical support. The audit started in 2003 and is the first comprehensive national assessment of second-tier sites in Wales which was undertaken largely by the local RIGS groups and CCW Earth Scientists. The majority of the funding came from the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund, but CCW contributed financially to the project in North Wales. The audit standardised the site documentation, digitised the site boundaries to a common format and ensured that the landowners and planning authorities were informed of the RIGS. A major input from CCW was the development of the GIS database for the project where all of the c.600 sites registered so far were digitised by CCW. CCW currently hosts these GIS data. The project is now nearing completion with the BGS co-ordinating the final stage of the audit in south and east Wales.

Objective 14 (Theme 6)

Encourage working together

  • GeoMôn partner
    In 2009, Anglesey became the second area in Wales to become a European Geopark. The Anglesey Geopark, known as GeoMôn, includes outstanding examples of Precambrian geology and is one of the finest places to study plate tectonic processes and features. CCW has heavy involvement in the ongoing geodiveristy activities and support of GeoMôn.

  • Involvement in LGAPs
    CCW have provided support and guidance in the development of Wales’ LGAPs - Anglesey LGAP is complete, and Clwydian Range AONB and Fforest Fawr (Brecon Beacons) Geopark LGAPs are in development.

  • Geodiversity Wales
    CCW is a lead partner, along with the National Museum Wales, the British Geological Survey and the Association of Welsh RIGS Groups, in setting up 'Geodiversity Wales' to bring together the major players in Welsh geoconservation. 'Geodiversity Wales' aims to promote an understanding of Welsh geology and landscape. In consultation with organisations and groups concerned with Welsh geology, geodiversity, landscape, heritage and culture this partnership will offer a co-ordinated, knowledgeable, consistent and integrated approach to geoconservation in Wales, and will provide robust scientific and policy advice to decision makers.

  • Supporting RIGS Interpretation initiatives
    Since its inception, CCW has supported partners who promote the understanding of geodiversity through grant aid and specialist support. One example of this is CCW's support of RIGS (Regionally Important Geodiversity Sites) groups who have been very active in developing interpretation initiatives that encourage the public to look at and appreciate the rocks and landscape around them. This may be through the development of trails looking at the geology between Aberystwyth and Clarach, or the mineral wealth of Coed y Brenin. But what has been especially successful is the development of geological town trails. These self-guided walks are available for a number of towns and look at the incredible wealth of building stones, obtained either locally or from around the world. Geological town trails offer an insight into the geological wealth of Wales and are an example of how geologists are keen raise awareness.