National Trust

The National Trust is a charity and is completely independent of Government. The National Trust protects and opens to the public over 350 historic houses, gardens and ancient monuments and also looks after forests, woods, fens, beaches, farmland, downs, moorland, islands, archaeological remains, castles, nature reserves, villages.

Objective 3 (Theme 2)

Demonstrate relevance to sustainable development

  • Geological Policy
    Geological Policy: The Trust will care for the natural and cultural geological significance of all our properties. The Trust will inform conservation and manage change in the geological environment and its features through learning, identifying, recording, understanding and communicating its significance. The Trust will share the geological significance of our properties with members, visitors and stakeholders for all to appreciate and enjoy.

  • Policy for the Collecting of Geological Materials
    The Trust recognises that geological materials can have scientific, recreational and aesthetic value and aims to: promote responsible and safe geological collecting on Trust land, where appropriate; minimise loss and damage to geological specimens and sites; and share the significance and beauty of geological specimens with local communities, interest groups and individuals for all to appreciate and enjoy.

  • Nature and the National Trust (2005) – central nature conservation policy
    Appendix 3 of the policy outlines the National Trust’s responsibilities towards key Earth Science features on NT properties, including: “Fossils, Rocks and Minerals”: Work with local geologists and RIGS groups to resolve key issues and conflicts; Promote responsible collecting and recording in line with Trust policy and local codes of conduct; “Coastal Landforms and Processes”: Allow natural erosion, deposition and flooding wherever possible in line with the Trust’s Coastal Policy; Engage with Shoreline Management Planning to promote the Trusts policies and address issues such as offshore dredging; “Caves and Karts”: Ensure farming activities (especially slurries and fertilisers) do not damage these features, include information in Whole Farm Plans and notify tenants; “Landslips and mass movement sites”: Discourage stabilisation, seeking professional geological advice; “Soils”: Continue to acquire and use detailed soil maps of properties where available and identify important sites for soils; Use soil attributes as part of the land capability assessments especially when deciding on farming systems and cropping on farms; Promote NT soils policy and include in educational materials; “Natural Rivers”: Restore rivers and allow natural functioning of floodplains; and “Stratigraphical features and Rock Exposures”: Keep exposures open as far as practical; Actively promote and provide opportunities for interpretation, recreation and education.

Objective 7 (Theme 4)

Maintain and enhance through management

  • Nature and the National Trust (2005) – central nature conservation policy
    Appendix 3 of the policy outlines the National Trust’s responsibilities towards key Earth Science features on NT properties, including: “Fossils, Rocks and Minerals”: Work with local geologists and RIGS groups to resolve key issues and conflicts; Promote responsible collecting and recording in line with Trust policy and local codes of conduct; “Coastal Landforms and Processes”: Allow natural erosion, deposition and flooding wherever possible in line with the Trust’s Coastal Policy; Engage with Shoreline Management Planning to promote the Trusts policies and address issues such as offshore dredging; “Caves and Karts”: Ensure farming activities (especially slurries and fertilisers) do not damage these features, include information in Whole Farm Plans and notify tenants; “Landslips and mass movement sites”: Discourage stabilisation, seeking professional geological advice; “Soils”: Continue to acquire and use detailed soil maps of properties where available and identify important sites for soils; Use soil attributes as part of the land capability assessments especially when deciding on farming systems and cropping on farms; Promote NT soils policy and include in educational materials; “Natural Rivers”: Restore rivers and allow natural functioning of floodplains; and “Stratigraphical features and Rock Exposures”: Keep exposures open as far as practical; Actively promote and provide opportunities for interpretation, recreation and education.

Objective 8 (Theme 4)

Share good practice

  • Nature and the National Trust (2005) – central nature conservation policy
    Appendix 3 of the policy outlines the National Trust’s responsibilities towards key Earth Science features on NT properties, including: “Fossils, Rocks and Minerals”: Work with local geologists and RIGS groups to resolve key issues and conflicts; Promote responsible collecting and recording in line with Trust policy and local codes of conduct; “Coastal Landforms and Processes”: Allow natural erosion, deposition and flooding wherever possible in line with the Trust’s Coastal Policy; Engage with Shoreline Management Planning to promote the Trusts policies and address issues such as offshore dredging; “Caves and Karts”: Ensure farming activities (especially slurries and fertilisers) do not damage these features, include information in Whole Farm Plans and notify tenants; “Landslips and mass movement sites”: Discourage stabilisation, seeking professional geological advice; “Soils”: Continue to acquire and use detailed soil maps of properties where available and identify important sites for soils; Use soil attributes as part of the land capability assessments especially when deciding on farming systems and cropping on farms; Promote NT soils policy and include in educational materials; “Natural Rivers”: Restore rivers and allow natural functioning of floodplains; and “Stratigraphical features and Rock Exposures”: Keep exposures open as far as practical; Actively promote and provide opportunities for interpretation, recreation and education.

Objective 9 (Theme 5)

Make relevant to the wider world

  • Provision of access and geo-tourism activities at sites of interest
    Alderley Edge Copper Mines in Cheshire are owned and managed by the NT with support from volunteers of the Derbyshire Caving Club (DCC). Regular underground tours, lectures and exhibitions are provided to maintain the mines as part of England’s industrial and geological heritage. Nationally important minerals are interpreted through a manned display and Open Days enable visitors to observe practical demonstrations of copper casting and rock drilling.

  • Self Guided Geological Trails and Walks
    Printed walks containing important local geological information, linked with industrial heritage highlights and local biodiversity, are available as downloads along sections, for example, of the Pembrokeshire coast and Malham Tarn in Yorkshire.

  • Geo-caching and coast-steering
    Making more of NT recreational activities such as ‘geocaching’ (for example, the geology geocache trail around Malham Cove) and ‘coast-steering’, to enhance the geological learning experience of visitors to the Trust’s properties.

  • Coastal Policy (Management Principles)
    Engaging with communities at sites under threat from coastal erosion. The publication ‘Shifting Shores’ is used to help open discussions in local communities on coastal change.

Objective 10 (Theme 5)

Use the arts to involve people

  • Restored ‘Geological Gallery’ at Biddulph Grange, Staffordshire
    James Bateman, botanist and orchid supplier to Charles Darwin, designed the gallery to refute the ideas in Darwin’s Origin of Species and was Bateman’s attempt to reconcile theology and geology. Rocks are displayed as a wall painting with their associated fossils displayed above, divided into the first six days of creation as described in the Bible. The collection has been recorded and annotated for public display by the North Staffordshire Geological Association.

Objective 14 (Theme 6)

Encourage working together

  • Nature and the National Trust (2005) – central nature conservation policy
    Appendix 3 of the policy outlines the National Trust’s responsibilities towards key Earth Science features on NT properties, including: “Fossils, Rocks and Minerals”: Work with local geologists and RIGS groups to resolve key issues and conflicts; Promote responsible collecting and recording in line with Trust policy and local codes of conduct; “Coastal Landforms and Processes”: Allow natural erosion, deposition and flooding wherever possible in line with the Trust’s Coastal Policy; Engage with Shoreline Management Planning to promote the Trusts policies and address issues such as offshore dredging; “Caves and Karts”: Ensure farming activities (especially slurries and fertilisers) do not damage these features, include information in Whole Farm Plans and notify tenants; “Landslips and mass movement sites”: Discourage stabilisation, seeking professional geological advice; “Soils”: Continue to acquire and use detailed soil maps of properties where available and identify important sites for soils; Use soil attributes as part of the land capability assessments especially when deciding on farming systems and cropping on farms; Promote NT soils policy and include in educational materials; “Natural Rivers”: Restore rivers and allow natural functioning of floodplains; and “Stratigraphical features and Rock Exposures”: Keep exposures open as far as practical; Actively promote and provide opportunities for interpretation, recreation and education.